<p>Marketing First, Flat-Fee Web Consulting for Success in Our Mobile World</p> <p>Marketing First, Flat-Fee Web Consulting for Success in Our Mobile World</p>
Home(Mobile Friendly)Contact
Home(Mobile Friendly)Contact

Why Should “Mobile Friendly”
Be a Top Business Priority?

Because We Are Now Living in a Mobile World

Online access is now in everyone’s pocket or literally in their hands - both day and night. People instinctively turn to their phones and hop online for every reason under the sun.

The business consequences for failing to optimize your online presence in a mobile environment are huge. And you suffer these consequences in two areas. The first is massive audience drop off during the critical first few seconds when your site loads and the second is a possible reduction in your Google page rank over time.

Here’s the History in 3 Sentences…

  1. At some point in 2014, mobile phones and desktop systems traded places as the device of choice for online access.
  2. This means that, ever since then, the use of mobile devices (mostly phones) for accessing the Internet has grown rapidly, far outpacing desktops for nearly every industry.
  3. This trend has continued to the point that, in July 2018, Google decided to implement their Mobile-First strategy, meaning they now judge every website according to mobile standards.

Mobile…Our New Reality

It’s undeniable…mobile devices now dominate our online world. Whether people are out and about or sitting on a couch at home, nearly everyone starts an inquiry or checks up on things on a phone.

If we want to attract an audience and keep them engaged, we must acknowledge these facts and create a web presence that, first and foremost, performs well in a small-screen, mobile environment.

How is This Affecting Your Business Right Now?

Google is now using mobile-performance as a ranking factor for all websites.

If you haven’t already addressed this reality, you are losing huge portions of your audience right now, before they know the first thing about you. How many of these people could have become new customers of yours?

“Responsive” May Not Be Good Enough

Even if your website is “responsive” and viewable on a phone, it may still fall short of Google’s new benchmarks.

This is why delivering a true, mobile-friendly experience is a very good business decision. In fact, it’s a key factor of online survival.

How Many People Use Phones to Visit Your Website?

It varies by industry, but more people than you think may be viewing your site on a small screen. Is your site optimized for that?

Statistics have shown that even for commerce websites, many people start their search and browse sites with their phones, then return to a site later, on a desktop, to place their order.  

Two Areas of Major Importance

There are two aspects of website design use that profoundly affect audience behavior and retention in a mobile environment. They are…

  1. Loading Speed, and…
  2. Mobile-Friendly Usability.

1. Loading Speed

Unfortunately, mobile users have very little patience. So, in our mobile world, speed matters…a lot.

A slower-loading website has business-killing consequences. More detailed statistics are readily available, but here’s an overview of the situation…

  • 47% of consumers expect a website to load in 2 seconds or less.
  • 50% of people abandon a website that takes more than 5 seconds to load.
  • After 11 to 15 seconds, about 65% of your audience is gone.

Losing Your Audience is No Joke

This is serious stuff…after just a few seconds, over half of your audience has vanished! And, after a few more seconds, they’re all gone.

What will this do to the popularity of your website? How will Google judge the relevance of your site if lots of people quickly bounce after using your keywords to find you?  

Google is All About the User

Google has always placed a very high value on a good user experience, which now includes not making impatient people wait for the information they’re seeking.

Providing instant gratification for your audience is smart business, because Google rewards higher clickthrough rates.

Note: Since most of your audience may be on a 4G network, your website may actually load quite quickly…but, Google’s robot assumes the speed of a 3G network to evaluate your site. Their reasoning is most users around the world are still on a 3G network.

Set your own experience aside, because doing well on Google’s 3G speed test is all that really counts.  

2. Mobile-Friendly Usability

“Mobile friendly” means more than just having a “responsive” website that’s viewable on a phone. There are several other factors to consider.

Viewing a website on a phone is a lot like looking at a wall poster through a pinhole. Only a small portion of your content is viewable at any one time. Here are some of the usability factors that come into play…

Header Graphic – You may need to create a small version of your header for optimum viewing on a narrow screen, especially if it contains text.

Headline Management – Break up headlines into shorter lines. This improves their readability on small screens.

Single Column – Everything on a phone is compressed into a single column. A responsive website will stack text and graphics into this column. This stacking function should keep your content in its proper order.

Text Size – Text that looks good and is easy to read on a desktop monitor may be too small to easily read on a phone. A happy medium must be found. It’s a challenge to find one size that works well in both environments.

Short Paragraphs – A single line of text on a large screen will become several lines of text on a phone. This converts a normal paragraph into a large block of text, which requires lots of scrolling from beginning to end. (For example, this paragraph will expand to nine or more lines on a phone.)

Bite-Size Sections – The best approach is to break up your content into smaller, but relevant sections for easier reading…almost like an outline. This helps visitors who are in distracting locations (stores, restaurants, waiting rooms, etc.) to easily comprehend and appreciate your content.

Paragraph Headings - Having bold headings for each short section of content keeps visitors engaged. When viewed on a phone, it’s ideal if the next heading appears just when the previous heading scrolls out of sight.

Upcoming Content – If you refer to content farther down the page, mention it directly and inform you visitors of its location. For example, “In the next section, you will see…”

Nuclear Option – To avoid the challenge of designing a single site that keeps visitors engaged during their entire browsing session in both desktop and mobile environments, you may wish to create a separate website that’s optimized for viewing on a phone.

Note: Remember, we’re now in a mobile-dominated world, so website development has been turned upside down.

If you’re starting from scratch, it’s best to develop a site optimized for small screens. A mobile-optimized site will be quite acceptable on a desktop screen, while the opposite is seldom true.

To repeat…making it a priority to develop a true, mobile-friendly experience is a very good business decision. In today’s world, it’s a key factor of online survival.

Test Your Existing Website Right Here…Right Now

Use the following links to test for loading speed and mobile-friendly design. They are now on Google’s list for judging page rank.

Loading Speed Test...

Mobile-Friendly Test... 

Post-Test Recommendations

After you run Google's Loading Speed Test, you will see additional items on the page. One is "Get My Free Report," which provides you with detailed information about how to improve your site so it loads faster. 

The second item is a link in the lower, right corner of the page that says, "See how you compare." Clicking on that will show you how your site compares to others in your industry. 

After you run Google's Mobile-Friendly Test, you will see a heading that says, "Additional resources." It's a list of items that will help you learn more. 

Since all of this follow-up information is provided by Google, it's recommended that you take the time to review it.  

Detecting Screen Size

Current technology enables the detection of the screen size of a visitor’s device. This makes it practical to develop individual pages or an entire website optimized for either mobile devices or desktop systems.

Visitors type in a single domain name and, depending on the device they're using, the appropriate screen format is automatically delivered, page by page.

Reasons That Easily Justify a Dedicated Mobile Site

  • Allows creation of a different header for best effect when viewed on a phone. This avoids the risk of a header graphic being distorted or compressed to fit a small screen.
  • You can add "Call" and "Text" buttons so visitors can quickly respond if they wish. Also, other buttons and links may need to be finger-friendly to prevent finger overlapping onto adjacent buttons.
  • You can offer a different page layout for better viewing on a phone. For example, text sizes and margin settings may be different for desktop and mobile viewing. 
  • An edited or condensed version of your existing site may be more appropriate for mobile users. Remember, mobile users are often in distracting environments and may appreciate a summarized version of your content. 
  • A mobile environment may suggest a different call to action than your existing desktop site. For example, you might want to encourage mobile visitors to go to your desktop site later to download PDFs or to view additional or more detailed content on a larger screen. 

These are just a few reasons why dedicated mobile pages or an entire site could be far more productive than a site where "responsive" specifications were deemed good enough.

Test This Function Right Now

To see this feature in action, view this site on both a desktop system and a phone.

The development platform for this site has detected
that you’re now using a desktop or laptop system.

Log onto this site with your phone to see a side-by-side comparison between the two formats.

What Are the Differences?

There are three differences between the large screen (desktop) and small screen (mobile) versions of this website…

1. The header graphic;

2. Format items; and

3. Copy.

1. The Header Graphic

The file size of the mobile header graphic is smaller (22kb) than the desktop header graphic (66kb) to enable faster loading. Also, the tag line is located along the bottom of the image to make room for the “Call Now” and “Text Now” buttons.

Those buttons are designed to make it easy for a visitor using a phone to conveniently call or send a text without having to type information into a contact form. (Always make things super easy for your visitors.)

The header graphic in the large screen version doesn’t need to make room for these buttons, since using the contact form is easy on a full-size keyboard.

2. Format Items

The different margins allow for shorter lines that are easier to read on a large screen. (Long lines of text are tedious and reduce incentive to continue reading.) Small screens don’t need these margins, since they are already narrow enough.

The headlines on some of the pages use different font sizes for easier reading in their respective environments. Also, some of the line breaks on the mobile version present the page headlines in a more logical order.

3. Copy

Any copy that relates directly to screen size must be specific to that particular device. For example, in the previous section, a statement is made regarding the real time detection of the device used to view this site (...you're now using a desktop, etc.). Each version of this site has copy specitic to that detection. 

Learn More...

Some platforms are better than others for performing this function. If you wish to learn more about this feature on this platform, use the Contact page to send along your questions or requests.

Back to Home Page

Why Should “Mobile Friendly”
Be a Top Business Priority?

Because We Are Now Living in a Mobile World

Online access is now in everyone’s pocket or literally in their hands - both day and night. People instinctively turn to their phones and hop online for every reason under the sun.

The business consequences for failing to optimize your online presence in a mobile environment are huge. And you suffer these consequences in two areas. The first is massive audience drop off during the critical first few seconds when your site loads and the second is a possible reduction in your Google page rank over time.

Here’s the History in 3 Sentences…

  1. At some point in 2014, mobile phones and desktop systems traded places as the device of choice for online access.
  2. This means that, ever since then, the use of mobile devices (mostly phones) for accessing the Internet has grown rapidly, far outpacing desktops for nearly every industry.
  3. This trend has continued to the point that, in July 2018, Google decided to implement their Mobile-First strategy, meaning they now judge every website according to mobile standards.

Mobile…Our New Reality

It’s undeniable…mobile devices now dominate our online world. Whether people are out and about or sitting on a couch at home, nearly everyone starts an inquiry or checks up on things on a phone.

If we want to attract an audience and keep them engaged, we must acknowledge these facts and create a web presence that, first and foremost, performs well in a small-screen, mobile environment.

How is This Affecting Your Business Right Now?

Google is now using mobile-performance as a ranking factor for all websites.

If you haven’t already addressed this reality, you are losing huge portions of your audience right now, before they know the first thing about you. How many of these people could have become new customers of yours?

“Responsive” May Not Be Good Enough

Even if your website is “responsive” and viewable on a phone, it may still fall short of Google’s new benchmarks.

This is why delivering a true, mobile-friendly experience is a very good business decision. In fact, it’s a key factor of online survival.

How Many People Use Phones to Visit Your Website?

It varies by industry, but more people than you think may be viewing your site on a small screen. Is your site optimized for that?

Statistics have shown that even for commerce websites, many people start their search and browse sites with their phones, then return to a site later, on a desktop, to place their order.  

Two Areas of Major Importance

There are two aspects of website design use that profoundly affect audience behavior and retention in a mobile environment. They are…

  1. Loading Speed, and…
  2. Mobile-Friendly Usability.

1. Loading Speed

Unfortunately, mobile users have very little patience. So, in our mobile world, speed matters…a lot.

A slower-loading website has business-killing consequences. More detailed statistics are readily available, but here’s an overview of the situation…

  • 47% of consumers expect a website to load in 2 seconds or less.
  • 50% of people abandon a website that takes more than 5 seconds to load.
  • After 11 to 15 seconds, about 65% of your audience is gone.

Losing Your Audience is No Joke

This is serious stuff…after just a few seconds, over half of your audience has vanished! And, after a few more seconds, they’re all gone.

What will this do to the popularity of your website? How will Google judge the relevance of your site if lots of people quickly bounce after using your keywords to find you?  

Google is All About the User

Google has always placed a very high value on a good user experience, which now includes not making impatient people wait for the information they’re seeking.

Providing instant gratification for your audience is smart business, because Google rewards higher clickthrough rates.

Note: Since most of your audience may be on a 4G network, your website may actually load quite quickly…but, Google’s robot assumes the speed of a 3G network to evaluate your site. Their reasoning is most users around the world are still on a 3G network.

Set your own experience aside, because doing well on Google’s 3G speed test is all that really counts.  

2. Mobile-Friendly Usability

“Mobile friendly” means more than just having a “responsive” website that’s viewable on a phone. There are several other factors to consider.

Viewing a website on a phone is a lot like looking at a wall poster through a pinhole. Only a small portion of your content is viewable at any one time. Here are some of the usability factors that come into play…

Header Graphic – You may need to create a small version of your header for optimum viewing on a narrow screen, especially if it contains text.

Headline Management – Break up headlines into shorter lines. This improves their readability on small screens.

Single Column – Everything on a phone is compressed into a single column. A responsive website will stack text and graphics into this column. This stacking function should keep your content in its proper order.

Text Size – Text that looks good and is easy to read on a desktop monitor may be too small to easily read on a phone. A happy medium must be found. It’s a challenge to find one size that works well in both environments.

Short Paragraphs – A single line of text on a large screen will become several lines of text on a phone. This converts a normal paragraph into a large block of text, which requires lots of scrolling from beginning to end. (For example, this paragraph will expand to nine or more lines on a phone.)

Bite-Size Sections – The best approach is to break up your content into smaller, but relevant sections for easier reading…almost like an outline. This helps visitors who are in distracting locations (stores, restaurants, waiting rooms, etc.) to easily comprehend and appreciate your content.

Paragraph Headings - Having bold headings for each short section of content keeps visitors engaged. When viewed on a phone, it’s ideal if the next heading appears just when the previous heading scrolls out of sight.

Upcoming Content – If you refer to content farther down the page, mention it directly and inform you visitors of its location. For example, “In the next section, you will see…”

Nuclear Option – To avoid the challenge of designing a single site that keeps visitors engaged during their entire browsing session in both desktop and mobile environments, you may wish to create a separate website that’s optimized for viewing on a phone.

Note: Remember, we’re now in a mobile-dominated world, so website development has been turned upside down.

If you’re starting from scratch, it’s best to develop a site optimized for small screens. A mobile-optimized site will be quite acceptable on a desktop screen, while the opposite is seldom true.

To repeat…making it a priority to develop a true, mobile-friendly experience is a very good business decision. In today’s world, it’s a key factor of online survival.

Test Your Existing Website Right Here…Right Now

Use the following links to test for loading speed and mobile-friendly design. They are now on Google’s list for judging page rank.

Loading Speed Test...

Mobile-Friendly Test... 

Post-Test Recommendations

After you run Google's Loading Speed Test, you will see additional items on the page. One is "Get My Free Report," which provides you with detailed information about how to improve your site so it loads faster. 

The second item is a link in the lower, right corner of the page that says, "See how you compare." Clicking on that will show you how your site compares to others in your industry. 

After you run Google's Mobile-Friendly Test, you will see a heading that says, "Additional resources." It's a list of items that will help you learn more. 

Since all of this follow-up information is provided by Google, it's recommended that you take the time to review it.  

Detecting Screen Size

Current technology enables the detection of the screen size of a visitor’s device. This makes it practical to develop individual pages or an entire website optimized for either mobile devices or desktop systems.

Visitors type in a single domain name and, depending on the device they're using, the appropriate screen format is automatically delivered, page by page.

Reasons That Easily Justify a Dedicated Mobile Site

  • Allows creation of a different header for best effect when viewed on a phone. This avoids the risk of a header graphic being distorted or compressed to fit a small screen.
  • You can add "Call" and "Text" buttons so visitors can quickly respond if they wish. Also, other buttons and links may need to be finger-friendly to prevent finger overlapping onto adjacent buttons.
  • You can offer a different page layout for better viewing on a phone. For example, text sizes and margin settings may be different for desktop and mobile viewing. 
  • An edited or condensed version of your existing site may be more appropriate for mobile users. Remember, mobile users are often in distracting environments and may appreciate a summarized version of your content. 
  • A mobile environment may suggest a different call to action than your existing desktop site. For example, you might want to encourage mobile visitors to go to your desktop site later to download PDFs or to view additional or more detailed content on a larger screen. 

These are just a few reasons why dedicated mobile pages or an entire site could be far more productive than a site where "responsive" specifications were deemed good enough.

Test This Function Right Now

To see this feature in action, view this site on both a desktop system and a phone.

The development platform
for this site has detected
that you are now using a
a phone (or a tablet).

Log onto this site with your desktop system to see a side-by-side comparison between the two formats.

What Are the Differences?

There are three differences between the large screen (desktop) and small screen (mobile) versions of this website…

1. The header graphic;

2. Format items; and

3. Copy.

1. The Header Graphic

The file size of the mobile header graphic is smaller (22kb) than the desktop header graphic (66kb) to enable faster loading. Also, the tag line is located along the bottom of the image to make room for the “Call Now” and “Text Now” buttons.

Those buttons are designed to make it easy for a visitor using a phone to conveniently call or send a text without having to type information into a contact form. (Always make things super easy for your visitors.)

The header graphic in the large screen version doesn’t need to make room for these buttons, since using the contact form is easy on a full-size keyboard.

2. Format Items

The different margins allow for shorter lines that are easier to read on a large screen. (Long lines of text are tedious and reduce incentive to continue reading.) Small screens don’t need these margins, since they are already narrow enough.

The headlines on some of the pages use different font sizes for easier reading in their respective environments. Also, some of the line breaks on the mobile version present the page headlines in a more logical order.

3. Copy

Any copy that relates directly to screen size must be specific to that particular device. For example, in the previous section, a statement is made regarding the real time detection of the device used to view this site (...you're now using a phone, etc.). Each version of this site has copy specitic to that detection. 

Learn More...

Some platforms are better than others for performing this function. If you wish to learn more about this feature on this platform, you can Call Now or Text Now or use the Contact page to send along your questions or requests.

Back to Home Page