<p>Before anything else, people want to know, What's in this for me...right now? Marketing First - How to Get More New Customers</p> <p>Before anything else, people want to know, What's in this for me...right now? Marketing First - How to Get More New Customers</p>
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“What’s In This For Me?”

Answer This In 3 or 4 Seconds or They’re Gone

Picture a typical online search. Someone out there in your target audience types a search term into their browser and a search engine results page (SERP) instantly appears with a vertical list of relevant choices.

Now, the scanning-and-deciding process begins, as your potential customers start scrolling down the page. They spend two or three seconds scanning and deciding the fate of each listing. “Is this close to what I’m looking for?”

How will you stand out? What words will you use to grab their attention? Why should they reward you with that at all-important click during those vital first few seconds?   

And, once they click and land on your site, the stopwatch starts all over again. You have a little bit more time here, but again, if they’re not immediately engaged by your content, they’ll bounce away.

What will be their primary motivation for clicking on your listing and then spending some time browsing around your site?

The answer in both of these cases is…

“What’s in this for me?”

This has been the defining question since the dawn of advertising and it’s still the core issue. Now, in our high-velocity, electronic world, when people have a vast array of choices, this question is more important than ever in your new-customer process.

In fact, in today’s second-by-second environment, the rule should be modified to…”What’s in this for me, right now?” And, it’s the “right now” part that determines the success of your new-customer process and grows your bottom line.

Remember This…Always

People search for benefits…not companies. You can sell them on a benefit in an instant. It takes minutes to sell them on your company. Your window of opportunity is 2 or 3 seconds, not minutes.

The answer to “What’s in this for me, right now?” is never a company…it’s always a benefit. Always talk about benefits first.

Question: Why would a business owner spend time and money promoting a message that doesn’t follow this single, life-or-death rule? Yet business owners do this all the time. It’s understandable, but fatal.

It’s fatal because it’s human nature to resist all forms of sales pressure. It’s in all of us. People like to buy, but no one likes to be sold.

Instant Death (Accidental Suicide)

Needless to say, your listing on a search engine results page is pretty darned important.  It's your online advertisement...your point of first contact with your audience out there in the world. Your success is in their hands, but connecting with them is your responsibility. You must give them a good reason to respond. 

If people searching for your type of product or service don’t click on your listing, it’s instant death for your all of your marketing efforts. No click…no visitors…no new customers…no money.

Pages Not Entire Websites

Perhaps you already know this but Google catalogs individual web pages, not entire websites. Every page of your website is cataloged separately by Google and can appear as a stand-alone item referenced on a search engine results page.

Because of this, visitors can enter your site on any of your pages, not necessarily on the home page. It might help to think of your website as a pack of individual landing pages, each containing a self-contained piece of your overall story.

This approach eliminates any awkwardness for people entering your website on secondary pages. If each page has its own, interesting story, it has the potential to immediately engage visitors and entice them into browsing further to get the full picture.   

Two Hurdles…

In your online quest for new customers, you have two related challenges.

You must…

  1. Survive a search by encouraging clicks on your listing; and…
  2. Hold the interest of new visitors to your website…the ones who clicked.

To repeat…the key to success in both cases is to clearly communicate, “What’s in this for me, right now?” This is the single, life-or-death rule.  

Hurdle #1

Since Google catalogs individual pages, there are two specific items describing each page that help Google determine the relevancy of the content as it relates to search terms typed into a browser. These items are not visible on the page. They are included in the underlying code, which Google “reads.”

These are…the page title (called a title tag) and the page description (called a meta description). These items are displayed on separate lines on a search engine results page. The link (URL) pointing to that specific page is displayed between them.

So, the title is on the first line; the URL in on the second line; and the description is on the third line. Together, they form your listing. The title is listed first (in blue), then the URL (usually in green) and then the description (in black).

It’s recommended that titles not exceed 60 characters (including spaces) and descriptions not exceed 120 characters. These limits make it highly likely that Google will display everything you write and doesn’t cut them short. This is most important in a mobile environment.

A typical listing looks like this:

Cats & Dogs, Etc. | One-Stop Shopping for Your Pet's Needs
https://catsanddogsetc.com/
Specializing in pet nutrition. Huge inventory. Find everything you need at our central location. Family run since 1974.

It’d be better if it looked like this:

Everything You Need for Healthy & Happy Pets is Always Here
https://catsanddogsetc.com/nutrition
Specializing in pet nutrition for long-term health of your special family member. Click for article, “Long, Happy Life.”

Since these three elements of a listing are displayed closely together, you will get maximum leverage if you treat the entire listing as a single, multi-ling advertisement, because that’s what it is.

This particular listing is promoting an individual page within the website – one dedicated to nutrition, as indicated in the URL. This highly focused approach has a much better chance of attracting and motivating action by people interested in the health of their pet than a general listing for a pet store. Each page on the site should promoted like this.

A pet owner interested in cat toys will be attracted to another page on the site dedicated to that subject and so on.

You can see how important the title and description tags are for each page. They enable people searching for something specific to immediately recognize a related benefit.

Note: Title and description tags serve a dual purpose because they’re “read” by two different “audiences.” The first is Google, as it helps to accurately determine the nature of the content on the page for search engine ranking purposes. The second audience is comprised of human beings on a quest. Many SEO experts focus on satisfying Google and neglect the needs of the human audience. A high-ranked listing is wasted if humans don’t click on it. The words must first satisfy Google then be persuasive to attract and motivate humans.

Hurdle #2

They’ve clicked on your listing and landed on your website. As mentioned above, you have a few more seconds with this challenge, but, again, you must quickly let them know they landed in the right place.

You do this by simply continuing the story you started in your listing. This makes the transition to your website should as smooth as possible. They clicked to learn more about that specific thing, right?

The description in the sample above said this,

Specializing in pet nutrition for long-term health of your special family member. Click for article, “Long, Happy Life.”

To continue this particular story, the headline at the top of the web page should be something like this…

How to Help Your Pet Live a Long and Healthy Life

Your story never skips a beat. Your audience just continues reading, becoming even more engaged along the way.

An educational piece like this is a nice boost to any audience. No company hype, just a pure, educational benefit. As they’re reading this helpful information, they’re also starting to think good thoughts about the company.

The One-Two Punch
This Technique is Actually Quite Simple
But How Often Do You See It?

You sailed over Hurdle #1 by converting your SERP listing into an effective, multi-line ad that motivates your audience to click. You included a tempting call to action on a subject known to be important to your target audience.

Then, using the principle of continuity, you sailed over Hurdle #2 by continuing the story with a compelling headline on your website. Your audience hit the ground running without missing a beat. They’re instantly engaged!  

Show Me the Money!

Can you see how important the first words they see are? Can you see that’s where the money is?

The first words contained in your SERP listing and then on your website must motivate your audience to take action. If they don’t, there will be no money. You will be doing business mostly by accident. It’s like fishing without bait.

The money is out there. Better words will attract it. And…you can super charge these first words with one of Mother Nature’s strongest forces. In fact, it’s a force stronger than a hurricane. (More on this below.)

How Do You Identify What’s in it for Them?
(How Do You Read Their Minds?)

No marketing guru and no out-of-town expert knows more about your customers than you do. Using that knowledge, here’s how you identify what matters most to your prospective customers.

Write down all the pre-sale questions people ask during your normal sales process. When they ask something specific about your product or service, they’re literally telling you what’s important to them.

Rank or prioritize them to see if you can to identify the single, most important issue that’s already on their mind.

When you have that, draft an arm’s length educational or informational document that focuses on that subject. This should be devoid of any sales hype. Remember, at this point, it’s all about them (benefits), not you (company).

At this stage, you’re simply helping them out. Your message contains zero sales pressure. This is how you get human nature working for you instead of against you.

Example 1 – A Bicycle Shop

The owner of a high-end bicycle shop wants to grow his business. So, wisely, he creates a message targeting their ideal type of customer. Instead of promoting his “brand,” a concept so popular nowadays, he drafts an educational piece, entitled, “The 3 Advantages of a Custom-Fit Performance Bicycle,” or any subject based on his list of most often-asked, pre-sale questions.

Example 2 – A Tropical Fish Store

The owner of a tropical fish store is interested growing her business, so she creates an educational piece entitled, “How to Keep Your Beautiful Fish Alive.” She knows this is a major concern of her customers who struggle with keeping their expensive fish alive and healthy.

Using appropriate keywords, these educational documents are posted on their respective websites and promoted online. For people interested in either of these products, which will attract more clicks…offering friendly and helpful information (a benefit), or a hyping their company?

Moderately-Interested People, Too

Common sense (and experience) tells us, that at any one point in time, there are a lot more people mildly interested in your product or service than there are serious buyers.

So, using a low-key, educational approach, even moderately-interested people will click and visit to learn more. Capturing these people favors you with significant mathematical leverage.

Maybe they’re just now developing an interest in what you sell and a zero-hype article is just the thing to encourage and support their mild level of interest. 

Again, this is how you get human nature working for you instead of against you.  

The List

You must be open-minded enough to have your brand temporarily take a back seat to your opening message. Whether it’s your Google listing or your web site (or even an offline ad), review the following list of what absolutely no one cares about during the first few seconds and the one thing they absolutely do care about, but seldom see.

What They Don’t Care About…

They don’t care about your company name, a clever tag line, fancy graphics, slick design, experienced staff, family owned, in business fifty years, full inventory, great customer service, friendly staff, etc.

Those are things all about you. Don’t worry, they will care about these things soon enough, but not during those vital, money-making, first few moments.

What They Do Care About…

You guessed it…what they do care about is...what’s in this for them…right now.

The Transition

You were smart enough to offer a neutral path of least resistance to encourage clicks and visits. Now, that they’re on your site, engage them with more good information to keep the momentum moving in your direction.

While they’re engaged in that, they’re warming up to the idea of doing business with you. Obviously, you care about them, or you wouldn’t be so helpful, right?

This is when they naturally start shifting their attention to your business…who you are…how you operate…your range of offerings, customer reviews, etc. The stuff they had zero interest in during their search but is quickly becoming relevant during their final decision-making process.

How to Super Charge Your Opening Message With
One of Nature’s Most Powerful Forces
(Stronger Than a Hurricane)

The best way to super charge the tried-and-true “what’s-in-this-for-me” approach is to wrap it in one of Mother Nature’s most powerful forces.

And, that force is…curiosity.

Curiosity draws people in like a huge magnet. Need proof? Look at all the click-bait buttons in the margins of online news pages. If they didn’t work, they wouldn’t be there.

“The Real Reason Hollywood Won’t Cast James Woods Any More,” or “Cher’s Mansion is Off the Charts,” or “Burt Reynolds’ Net Worth Shocked His Family.”

Have you ever clicked on one of those, even though you know it’s BS? Everyone has. Why? They were curious, of course. And, it’s always BS, but that doesn’t mean we’re all not still vulnerable to our own curiosity. It’s a powerful force.

What more proof? Have you ever walked down the middle of the aisle at a trade show, avoiding eye contact with the people in the booths on each side because you didn’t want to be subjected to sales pressure?

All of a sudden, something you see or hear sparks your curiosity. Your defenses drop way down and you step forward to learn more, even at the risk of dealing with a sales person. It all happens in an instant.

About that hurricane…have you ever seen news reports about a hurricane on TV? Have you seen people out in the storm to see, first hand, how strong it is? Brave (or stupid) surfers have actually been out there, too!

Between these two forces of nature - a hurricane and curiosity - curiosity is stronger. Use it to your advantage every chance you get.

It’s not Magic…But It’s Close

If you offer a good answer to “What’s in this for me?” and wrap it in curiosity, you will be going with the flow of a very positive aspect of human nature.

If you can think of a better way to grab and hold the attention of your audience during those critical first few seconds, run, don’t walk, to the patent office and protect your secret.

How to Create Curiosity

Here’s where you’re lucky. If you took the time to catalog those all-important, pre-sale questions mentioned above, you already have the best clues to what triggers curiosity in your audience.

If some asks you a question, they’re telling you what interests them…what they’re curious about. But, to boost it a little, try to include a little drama, too.

For example, starting off with “How to…” is a time-tested approach that works well. Example: “How to Keep Your Beautiful Fish Alive.”

Asking a question can also work. Example: “How Quickly Can Termites Do Real Damage to Your House?”

Play on fear. Example: “How Safe Are Public Swimming Pools?”

Gossip. Example: “Actors Who Have Ruined Their Careers”

Dreamers. Example: “See before-and-after photographs of our projects.”  

A good, what’s-in-it-for-me message wrapped with creative curiosity can stop people in their tracks during those first few critical seconds…those few seconds when they’re scanning your message and deciding your future. Because, that's where the money is.

It’s all done with words. Better words = better results.


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Mobile Friendly
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“What’s In This For Me?”

Answer This In 3 or 4 Seconds or They’re Gone

Picture a typical online search. Someone out there in your target audience types a search term into their browser and a search engine results page (SERP) instantly appears with a vertical list of relevant choices.

Now, the scanning-and-deciding process begins, as your potential customers start scrolling down the page. They spend two or three seconds scanning and deciding the fate of each listing. “Is this close to what I’m looking for?”

How will you stand out? What words will you use to grab their attention? Why should they reward you with that at all-important click during those vital first few seconds?   

And, once they click and land on your site, the stopwatch starts all over again. You have a little bit more time here, but again, if they’re not immediately engaged by your content, they’ll bounce away.

What will be their primary motivation for clicking on your listing and then spending some time browsing around your site?

The answer in both of these cases is…

“What’s in this for me?”

This has been the defining question since the dawn of advertising and it’s still the core issue. Now, in our high-velocity, electronic world, when people have a vast array of choices, this question is more important than ever in your new-customer process.

In fact, in today’s second-by-second environment, the rule should be modified to…”What’s in this for me, right now?” And, it’s the “right now” part that determines the success of your new-customer process and grows your bottom line.

Remember This…Always

People search for benefits…not companies. You can sell them on a benefit in an instant. It takes minutes to sell them on your company. Your window of opportunity is 2 or 3 seconds, not minutes.

The answer to “What’s in this for me, right now?” is never a company…it’s always a benefit. Always talk about benefits first.

Question: Why would a business owner spend time and money promoting a message that doesn’t follow this single, life-or-death rule? Yet business owners do this all the time. It’s understandable, but fatal.

It’s fatal because it’s human nature to resist all forms of sales pressure. It’s in all of us. People like to buy, but no one likes to be sold.

Instant Death (Accidental Suicide)

Needless to say, your listing on a search engine results page is pretty darned important.  It's your online advertisement...your point of first contact with your audience out there in the world. Your success is in their hands, but connecting with them is your responsibility. You must give them a good reason to respond. 

If people searching for your type of product or service don’t click on your listing, it’s instant death for your all of your marketing efforts. No click…no visitors…no new customers…no money.

Pages Not Entire Websites

Perhaps you already know this but Google catalogs individual web pages, not entire websites. Every page of your website is cataloged separately by Google and can appear as a stand-alone item referenced on a search engine results page.

Because of this, visitors can enter your site on any of your pages, not necessarily on the home page. It might help to think of your website as a pack of individual landing pages, each containing a self-contained piece of your overall story.

This approach eliminates any awkwardness for people entering your website on secondary pages. If each page has its own, interesting story, it has the potential to immediately engage visitors and entice them into browsing further to get the full picture.   

Two Hurdles…

In your online quest for new customers, you have two related challenges.

You must…

  1. Survive a search by encouraging clicks on your listing; and…
  2. Hold the interest of new visitors to your website…the ones who clicked.

To repeat…the key to success in both cases is to clearly communicate, “What’s in this for me, right now?” This is the single, life-or-death rule.  

Hurdle #1

Since Google catalogs individual pages, there are two specific items describing each page that help Google determine the relevancy of the content as it relates to search terms typed into a browser. These items are not visible on the page. They are included in the underlying code, which Google “reads.”

These are…the page title (called a title tag) and the page description (called a meta description). These items are displayed on separate lines on a search engine results page. The link (URL) pointing to that specific page is displayed between them.

So, the title is on the first line; the URL in on the second line; and the description is on the third line. Together, they form your listing. The title is listed first (in blue), then the URL (usually in green) and then the description (in black).

It’s recommended that titles not exceed 60 characters (including spaces) and descriptions not exceed 120 characters. These limits make it highly likely that Google will display everything you write and doesn’t cut them short. This is most important in a mobile environment.  

A typical listing looks like this:

Cats & Dogs, Etc. | One-Stop Shopping for Your Pet's Needs
https://catsanddogsetc.com/
Specializing in pet nutrition. Huge inventory. Find everything you need at our central location. Family run since 1974.

It’d be better if it looked like this:

Everything You Need for Healthy & Happy Pets is Always Here
https://catsanddogsetc.com/nutrition
Specializing in pet nutrition for long-term health of your special family member. Click for article, "Long, Happy Life."

Since these three elements of a listing are displayed closely together, you will get maximum leverage if you treat the entire listing as a single, multi-ling advertisement, because that’s what it is.

This particular listing is promoting an individual page within the website – one dedicated to nutrition, as indicated in the URL. This highly focused approach has a much better chance of attracting and motivating action by people interested in the health of their pet than a general listing for a pet store. Each page on the site should promoted like this.

A pet owner interested in cat toys will be attracted to another page on the site dedicated to that subject and so on.

You can see how important the title and description tags are for each page. They enable people searching for something specific to immediately recognize a related benefit.

Note: Title and description tags serve a dual purpose because they’re “read” by two different “audiences.” The first is Google, as it helps to accurately determine the nature of the content on the page for search engine ranking purposes. The second audience is comprised of human beings on a quest. Many SEO experts focus on satisfying Google and neglect the needs of the human audience. A high-ranked listing is wasted if humans don’t click on it. The words must first satisfy Google then be persuasive to attract and motivate humans.

Hurdle #2

They’ve clicked on your listing and landed on your website. As mentioned above, you have a few more seconds with this challenge, but, again, you must quickly let them know they landed in the right place.

You do this by simply continuing the story you started in your listing. This makes the transition to your website should as smooth as possible. They clicked to learn more about that specific thing, right?

The description in the sample above said this,

Specializing in pet nutrition for long-term health of your special family member. Click for article, “Long, Happy Life.”

To continue this particular story, the headline at the top of the web page should be something like this…

How to Help Your Pet Live a Long and Healthy Life

Your story never skips a beat. Your audience just continues reading, becoming even more engaged along the way.

An educational piece like this is a nice boost to any audience. No company hype, just a pure, educational benefit. As they’re reading this helpful information, they’re also starting to think good thoughts about the company.

The One-Two Punch
This Technique is Actually Quite Simple
But How Often Do You See It?

You sailed over Hurdle #1 by converting your SERP listing into an effective, multi-line ad that motivates your audience to click. You included a tempting call to action on a subject known to be important to your target audience.

Then, using the principle of continuity, you sailed over Hurdle #2 by continuing the story with a compelling headline on your website. Your audience hit the ground running without missing a beat. They’re instantly engaged!  

Show Me the Money!

Can you see how important the first words they see are? Can you see that’s where the money is?

The first words contained in your SERP listing and then on your website must motivate your audience to take action. If they don’t, there will be no money. You will be doing business mostly by accident. It’s like fishing without bait.

The money is out there. Better words will attract it. And…you can super charge these first words with one of Mother Nature’s strongest forces. In fact, it’s a force stronger than a hurricane. (More on this below.)

How Do You Identify What’s in it for Them?
(How Do You Read Their Minds?)

No marketing guru and no out-of-town expert knows more about your customers than you do. Using that knowledge, here’s how you identify what matters most to your prospective customers.

Write down all the pre-sale questions people ask during your normal sales process. When they ask something specific about your product or service, they’re literally telling you what’s important to them.

Rank or prioritize them to see if you can to identify the single, most important issue that’s already on their mind.

When you have that, draft an arm’s length educational or informational document that focuses on that subject. This should be devoid of any sales hype. Remember, at this point, it’s all about them (benefits), not you (company).

At this stage, you’re simply helping them out. Your message contains zero sales pressure. This is how you get human nature working for you instead of against you.

Example 1 – A Bicycle Shop

The owner of a high-end bicycle shop wants to grow his business. So, wisely, he creates a message targeting their ideal type of customer. Instead of promoting his “brand,” a concept so popular nowadays, he drafts an educational piece, entitled, “The 3 Advantages of a Custom-Fit Performance Bicycle,” or any subject based on his list of most often-asked, pre-sale questions.

Example 2 – A Tropical Fish Store

The owner of a tropical fish store is interested growing her business, so she creates an educational piece entitled, “How to Keep Your Beautiful Fish Alive.” She knows this is a major concern of her customers who struggle with keeping their expensive fish alive and healthy.

Using appropriate keywords, these educational documents are posted on their respective websites and promoted online. For people interested in either of these products, which will attract more clicks…offering friendly and helpful information (a benefit), or a hyping their company?

Moderately-Interested People, Too

Common sense (and experience) tells us, that at any one point in time, there are a lot more people mildly interested in your product or service than there are serious buyers.

So, using a low-key, educational approach, even moderately-interested people will click and visit to learn more. Capturing these people favors you with significant mathematical leverage.

Maybe they’re just now developing an interest in what you sell and a zero-hype article is just the thing to encourage and support their mild level of interest. 

Again, this is how you get human nature working for you instead of against you.  

The List

You must be open-minded enough to have your brand temporarily take a back seat to your opening message. Whether it’s your Google listing or your web site (or even an offline ad), review the following list of what absolutely no one cares about during the first few seconds and the one thing they absolutely do care about, but seldom see.

What They Don’t Care About…

They don’t care about your company name, a clever tag line, fancy graphics, slick design, experienced staff, family owned, in business fifty years, full inventory, great customer service, friendly staff, etc.

Those are things all about you. Don’t worry, they will care about these things soon enough, but not during those vital, money-making, first few moments.

What They Do Care About…

You guessed it…what they do care about is...what’s in this for them…right now.

The Transition

You were smart enough to offer a neutral path of least resistance to encourage clicks and visits. Now, that they’re on your site, engage them with more good information to keep the momentum moving in your direction.

While they’re engaged in that, they’re warming up to the idea of doing business with you. Obviously, you care about them, or you wouldn’t be so helpful, right?

This is when they naturally start shifting their attention to your business…who you are…how you operate…your range of offerings, customer reviews, etc. The stuff they had zero interest in during their search but is quickly becoming relevant during their final decision-making process.

How to Super Charge Your Opening Message With
One of Nature’s Most Powerful Forces
(Stronger Than a Hurricane)

The best way to super charge the tried-and-true “what’s-in-this-for-me” approach is to wrap it in one of Mother Nature’s most powerful forces.

And, that force is…curiosity.

Curiosity draws people in like a huge magnet. Need proof? Look at all the click-bait buttons in the margins of online news pages. If they didn’t work, they wouldn’t be there.

“The Real Reason Hollywood Won’t Cast James Woods Any More,” or “Cher’s Mansion is Off the Charts,” or “Burt Reynolds’ Net Worth Shocked His Family.”

Have you ever clicked on one of those, even though you know it’s BS? Everyone has. Why? They were curious, of course. And, it’s always BS, but that doesn’t mean we’re all not still vulnerable to our own curiosity. It’s a powerful force.

What more proof? Have you ever walked down the middle of the aisle at a trade show, avoiding eye contact with the people in the booths on each side because you didn’t want to be subjected to sales pressure?

All of a sudden, something you see or hear sparks your curiosity. Your defenses drop way down and you step forward to learn more, even at the risk of dealing with a sales person. It all happens in an instant.

About that hurricane…have you ever seen news reports about a hurricane on TV? Have you seen people out in the storm to see, first hand, how strong it is? Brave (or stupid) surfers have actually been out there, too!

Between these two forces of nature - a hurricane or curiosity - curiosity is stronger. Use it to your advantage every chance you get.

It’s not Magic…But It’s Close

If you offer a good answer to “What’s in this for me?” and wrap it in curiosity, you will be going with the flow of a very positive aspect of human nature.

If you can think of a better way to grab and hold the attention of your audience during those critical first few seconds, run, don’t walk, to the patent office and protect your secret.

How to Create Curiosity

Here’s where you’re lucky. If you took the time to catalog those all-important, pre-sale questions mentioned above, you already have the best clues to what triggers curiosity in your audience.

If some asks you a question, they’re telling you what interests them…what they’re curious about. But, to boost it a little, try to include a little drama, too.

For example, starting off with “How to…” is a time-tested approach that works well. Example: “How to Keep Your Beautiful Fish Alive.”

Asking a question can also work. Example: “How Quickly Can Termites Do Real Damage to Your House?”

Play on fear. Example: “How Safe Are Public Swimming Pools?”

Gossip. Example: “Actors Who Have Ruined Their Careers”

Dreamers. Example: “See before-and-after photographs of our projects.”  

A good, what’s-in-it-for-me message wrapped with creative curiosity can stop people in their tracks during those first few critical seconds…those few seconds when they’re scanning your message and deciding your future. Because, that's where the money is. 

It’s all done with words. Better words = better results.

Home Page
Mobile Friendly
Bullet-Point Summary
Price List
Contact